Mesa, Arizona car accidents reduced by traffic-enforcement camera program

Authorities credit red-light cameras for a 7 percent decline in Mesa car accidents last year, The Arizona Republic reported.

While the number of fatal crashes in 2009 remained flat at 29 compared to 2008, police contend photo enforcement at 36 intersections has reduced the overall number of serious Mesa traffic accidents. In addition to the intersection cams, the city has also deployed six stationary speed cameras and six photo-enforcement vans. Authorities review density maps and areas with a high number of collisions in determining where to place the cameras.
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Roadways most targeted include the most-traveled and longest streets in Mesa, including Southern Avenue, which has 10 cameras, and Broadway Road, which has five. Power Road also has five intersection cameras, while Stapley, Mesa and University drives each have four cameras.

Through Dec. 15 of last year, police used the cameras to issue 23,533 citations to drivers traveling 11 mph or more over the posted speed limit. More than 18,000 citations were issued to red-light runners during the same period.

The speeding fines cost drivers $171.25, which red-light runners were fined $218.50.

Of the speeding violations, Mesa Municipal Court reports that 8,488 were either dismissed by the police department or dismissed by the court because the driver wasn’t served the ticket. For red-light violations, 6,139 were dismissed.

Through the first four months of this year, about 27 percent fewer tickets have been issued; police hope part of the reason is because motorists are doing a better job of complying with the law, though they acknowledge some drivers are likely using extra caution because they are now aware of the cameras’ presence.

Either way, the program is having the intended impact of reducing Mesa car accidents.

If you or a loved one has been injured in an accident, the Arizona car crash attorneys at Abels & Annes offer free and confidential appointments to discuss your rights. Call (602) 819-5191.