Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems Can Prevent Car Accidents

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Advances in vehicular design have been rolling out with such speed that many drivers do not even realize the full range of features their vehicles possess. While some changes can’t help but be noticed – like a car that parallel parks itself – others are more obscure and may function behind-the-scenes, making a drive safer, more comfortable, or even more efficient all without any action on the part of a motorist. One of those features that gets less attention and less recognition than others is the advent of automatic tire pressure monitoring systems which have been around for some time but have only been standard in recent years.

If your vehicle was manufactured on or after September of 2007, it is required to have a tire pressure monitoring system. These systems work by automatically monitoring the tire pressure in a vehicle’s four tires. If the pressure in any tire is either too high or too low, a driver will be alerted to the issue by an on-dash visual cue, an audible tone, or a combination of both. All tire monitoring systems check for underinflation but only some monitor for pressures that are too high so it is important to know the basics of the system used by your car.

There are two main types of sensors that make tire pressure monitoring possible. Direct sensors are present in some vehicles and work by utilizing a small, wireless device inside each of the vehicle’s four tires. These devices monitor pressure directly and can detect both overinflated and underinflated tires. In contrast, indirect sensors are not present inside each wheel but rather work by monitoring the spin of the tires, thereby determining when those tires are underinflated. Indirect sensors are not capable of sensing inflation that is too high and therefore can only alert a driver when pressure is too low.

If you are a driver who often forgets to check your tires, this new technology could make a significant difference in your safety behind the wheel. Tires that either have too much or too little air in them pose a danger to those inside the vehicle because improperly inflated tires are more likely to blow out than those kept at the right air pressure levels. Blown tires can lead to the loss of control of the vehicle which makes a car accident or other collision possible and injuries may result.

Beyond the risks of a tire blowing, pressure is also important for the overall life and value you receive out of your tires. Proper air pressure helps to ensure that tires will wear in a uniform, even manner which will prolong the useful life of each tire and enable you to get your money’s worth out of them. If a tire routinely has pressure that is too high or too low, that tire will suffer damage from normal use of the vehicle and will need to be replaced more frequently – even if the tire never blows or is otherwise destroyed.

Tire pressure can affect those outside of a vehicle as well as those inside, and often injuries may result from these incidents. If you were involved in a crash in Phoenix that was caused by a blown car tire, you may be entitled to compensation for the injuries you endured in the accident and for the pain and suffering that you experienced.

The personal injury law firm of Abels & Annes, P.C. has a lawyer available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year to take your call toll free at (855) PHX-LAWYER or locally at (602) 819-5191. We offer a case consultation without cost and without obligation to all those victims who contact us and we will keep everything discussed during that consultation confidential. Further, if we represent you in your case, we will fight for the best possible outcome for you and we will never charge you a fee unless we successfully make a recovery on your behalf.

If you have questions or if you need help following your accident, call the attorneys at Abels & Annes, P.C. today and let us get to work for you.

Prior Blog Entry:

Safety Group Advocates for Better Pool Safety, Phoenix Injury Lawyer Blog, published November 18, 2015.